a howl on the moor

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 Ah, and here it is… the long-awaited second half of my comments on “The Hound of the Baskervilles,” starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.

When we left our heroes, Holmes had shed his beggar disguise, and he and Watson were headed back to Baskerville Hall.  As they walk across Dartmoor, suddenly, they hear a howl…

  • How can they “follow” a sound that has stopped?
  • “Notting Hill Murderer”?  Where did this subplot come from?  Are Will & Anna involved?
Should they be worried about the Notting Hill Murderer? 

Should they be worried about the Notting Hill Murderer?

  • Ah, the boot is properly explained.  This was a good clue.
  • Again with Stapleton recognizing people whom he has never before met!  That’s quite a skill.
  • Why is Stapleton not at all shocked by the dead body at his feet?  Shouldn’t he show at least a bit of horror?
  • Holmes is kind when he breaks the news to Mrs. Barryman.
  • Again!  These “upper-crust” types have no lasting sympathy for underlings– they are to be considered and then dismissed.
  • Oh, Rathbone!  That was nearly straight to camera.

  • I like these discussions on the train between Holmes and Watson, explaining the plots & plans.  It is very reminiscent of what I like best about the radio series.
  • Ah– Mr. Franklin, you are so spunky!
  • How unfortunate about the wagon.
  • What a sweet touch with the broach.
  • That’s quite the dress & jewelry Beryl is wearing!
  • The Stapleton’s hall looks like it was designed by a high-school acting company on a budget.
  • Ah– an what is the cunning Stapleton up to now?  Black gloves bode no good.
  • Poor doggie!  But that explains the “grave-robbing” charge.
  • Now, given the size of Dartmoor, I find it rather inconceivable that Holmes and Watson can find the moving dog by his growls.
  • Quite the savage dog attack, actually.  Pretty intense.
  • Again, the poor doggie.  Was it really necessary to shoot at him?
  • “Mr. Holmes…” you were wrong.
  • It was pretty clear that “IT” was a dog, Sir Henry.
  • Nice bit of tracking by Holmes and good sound effect touches in the background– noticable for the general lack of music through the rest of the film
  • Oh, Holmes!  You should have seen that one coming.  We all did.
  • Why aren’t they treating Sir Henry for rabies?  He was just attacked by a vicious dog.
  • Why does Stapleton want him dead?
  • No, Don’t Drink It!

Don't be like Alice, Sir Henry!

  • Awfully clever of you, Holmes!  How did you manage that trick?  {we’re never shown}
  • About that dog:  I seem to recall that the dog in the book was painted to glow in the moonlight. Maybe they couldn’t manage it in the studio?
  • A cute plot, young Stapleton.  Completely mad, but cute.
  • So, where did Holmes get these constables, eh?  He hasn’t been to town since he left with Watson on the return train.
  • Uncharacteristic of Holmes not to go running after his quarry.  The man just disappears, and we never hear about him again.  What an anti-climactic ending.
  • Holmes’s face during Mortimer’s effusions is classic.
  • Wait?  What?!  He just goes to bed?  That’s it?!  And everyone takes this?
  • Wow.  “Oh, and Watson, the needle.” — First off, kudos for sneaking that reference past the censors; Second- -pedants would know that Holmes would never use his needle right after a case– only when he got bored.

Ok– Overall, a decent first-effort towards telling the story on film and contains an excellent pair of Holmes & Watson.  However, the plot is over-simplified and the ending falls very flat.  A shame, that.  It’s a fairly short movie, and there should have been plenty of room to fill in the details.

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2 responses »

  1. This sounds like a good movie. I’ve always loved Holmes. Have you ever read any of the Lupin stories, by Maurice LeBlanc? I can bet you’d enjoy them. He’s like a French Holmes who steals stuff. They even meet in a few stories, and Lupin lifts Holmes’s pocketwatch, which is pretty much the coolest thing ever done.

  2. It was a pretty good movie. I love Rathbone and Bruce (as you may be able to tell), but I was disappointed about how the ending (which is a dramatic chase-scene in the novel) was handled.

    I’ve never heard of the Lupin stories, but they sound like fun. Another addition to my library list for Saturday. Thanks!

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